Tag: editing

Learn how you can increase translation quality while cutting costs.

Responsibility Is Key to Good Translation Editing

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If you are on a lookout for a good translation editor, the single most important quality to look for is responsibility. An editor can be very knowledgeable and experienced—a genius, if you like—but this is nothing without responsibility. A less skilled but more motivated editor will run circles around an unmotivated genius. 100% responsibility Editors […]

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Another Improvement in Translation Process Made Possible by OmegaT

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Recently, I wrote about how Kos Ivantsov’s scripts help make better use of OmegaT. Let’s look at one specific example now. We had a job recently that in addition to new text, had some 40,000 full (100%) matches that we agreed with the client not to review. This job included DTP and post-DTP review. In […]

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Never Rush to Edit

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Many translators do not like editing (reviewing, revision). For this reason, it is important to make editing as pleasant as possible. One way to do so is to avoid making edits on the spot; that is, correcting things you do not like, as soon as you see them. Incorrect corrections can drive anyone crazy As […]

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No Harm, No Foul

I wrote a couple of posts in the past about how important it was to focus on adding value rather than picking on the small things while editing a translation. I want to reinforce this idea now by explaining where the borderline between a major and a minor error is exactly. I believe that in […]

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Three Ways to Enjoy OPT

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It’s a common attitude among translators to dislike other people translations (OPT). But what I discovered for myself is that this attitude is often unproductive. This post outlines three specific ways for going into a more productive state. Translation Errors Are Inevitable I’m very tolerant of errors because I know that translation is prone to […]

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“Surprise” Review. Part 2

This is part 2 of this post. For part 1, please follow this link. There are two types of inconsistency. The first type is inconsistency at the term level. To avoid errors of this kind, we use tools such as glossaries and QA Distiller to automatically check for any discrepancies. A client’s editor doesn’t always […]

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“Surprise” Review. Part 1

Last week, one of our clients contacted us with an update of a manual we had previously translated from English into Russian. The client made changes to the source text and now wanted us to make the same changes in the Russian version by updating the old translations and adding the new ones directly in […]

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