Video: Translating Trados Files in OmegaT? It’s Never Been Easier!


December 27th, 2015, Roman Mironov

Are you tasked with translating SDLXLIFF files from an agency client, but want to use OmegaT to do the translation? This may happen when you do not own a SDL Trados Studio license or you, like some of our readers, have an aversion to this program. Here is the good news: OmegaT makes such task easy with the use of the XLIFF filter included in the Okapi plugin. In fact, this filter has been around for a few years, but it is only with the M26 release that it can save translated SDLXLIFFs properly, without breaking them.

How to use the Okapi XLIFF filter

Choosing XLIFF filter provided by Okapi plugin in OmegaT

  1. Put SDLXLIFF files into the source folder of your OmegaT project.
  2. Open the project, then open project properties and go to File Filters. Make sure the XLIFF files (Okapi) filter is checked, while the XLIFF (native) filter is unchecked. OmegaT will highlight the current filter for your convenience.
  3. In the project properties, uncheck Enable Sentence-level segmenting. By disabling segmentation, you keep the original segmentation of SDLXLIFF files and also enable OmegaT to insert any 100% matches automatically.
  4. Translate the text.
  5. Create the translated files.

Roundtrip

Although this is absolutely the easiest way to translate SDLXLIFF files in OmegaT, I cannot promise it is the safest one. I did test it extensively and found no problems so far. However, I stongly recommend a roundtrip. Before diving deep in translation, you translate a few segments, save the “translated” file, and open it in SDL Trados Studio to make sure everything is fine.

It is also a good idea to open translated files in Studio after completing translation. Obviously, to do this kind of check, you need to own a Studio license. If you do not have one, at least have a colleague who has such a license and can check files for you in important projects.

Scenarios

You may also want to use this route with files that have a lot of 100% matches, because there is no easy way to handle such files with the native XLIFF filter.

Issues

What is still slightly disappointing about this filter is that tags it displays have incremental numbers, which can undesirably turn non-unique segments (i.e., repetitions) into unique ones.
Tags by the Okapi plugin filter vs. tags by the native XLIFF filter

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Комментарии:

  1. Erik Piper

    Unfortunately this is still not enough to satisfy some agencies, as they demand work with SDLPPX files.

  2. Chris

    What’s really the point of this procedure if you have to have a Trados license ?

    • Having a Trados license is not necessary. It is good if you have it, because you can open translated files in SDL Trados Studio to see if they are valid, but this is optional.

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